Looking for help with beam pivot fab

Greaslife

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So my son and I are building a 95 Ford ranger
Were using equal length 1972 1 inch kingpin beams.
My question is on all the posts that are from the past along with all the YouTube studies I’ve done nobody’s talking about locations of being pivots.
I do understand that you could push them forward to gain a little bit of wheelbase. What I’m trying to figure out is everybody either has a vertical beam pivot coming off the frame or they have some that are like 10-15° off the frame to the outside. is there a benefit to having a 10 or 15° off frame beam pivot or is it just personal preference? Does it have something to do with string?
 
Most is personal preference and based on ur beams that you are using. Beam mounts dictate camber curve, wheel base, track width and can also affect ur radius arm mounting location. Vertical spacing can affect ur uptravel. I would say figure out ur wheel base, track width and where u want bump and go from there.
 
Most is personal preference and based on ur beams that you are using. Beam mounts dictate camber curve, wheel base, track width and can also affect ur radius arm mounting location. Vertical spacing can affect ur uptravel. I would say figure out ur wheel base, track width and where u want bump and go from there.
So I’m planning on going Center mountain radius arm that way I can kind of control caster change better. I know guys “cut and turn the beams” I went through this on my bronco back in the day. And that dictates camber at ride Height.
So does the beam mounting location “in degrees of angle along with overall length of bracket and beam “ controls camber through the suspension travel? I’m sure that is what you’re saying just have to type it out to get my brain working. I’m slow apologies
 
Camber change can be reduced with a longer I-beam.
On the Next set of beams and beam mounts I make, I will make my beam mounts outboard of the frame a little to aid in locating the steering swinger pivots and having them line up with beam pivot.
 
We put the Ranger pivots out because the frame is narrow to get the beam to be longer. The full-size trucks have a wider frame, so you see the pivots below. I have Pivots if you need.
 

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So I’m planning on going Center mountain radius arm that way I can kind of control caster change better. I know guys “cut and turn the beams” I went through this on my bronco back in the day. And that dictates camber at ride Height.
So does the beam mounting location “in degrees of angle along with overall length of bracket and beam “ controls camber through the suspension travel? I’m sure that is what you’re saying just have to type it out to get my brain working. I’m slow apologies
Camber curve is the main reason like someone mentioned. Longer beam = less camber change. Height will mainly affect your bump if you are using an already built beam with not much kick in it. I am no beam master but will be designing a beam kit for my f100 pretty soon. I do enjoy suspension geometry and have done a few installs on beams along with steering.
 
Just for simplicity sake i would buy a set of bolt on beam pivots from BTF or Giant, or whomever else makes them. Itll save a good chunk of time and get you a good head start on setting the rest of the suspension up. Ideally the beam pivots are a few inches higher than hub centerline, and the radius arm pivots are below the beam pivots when viewed from the side. Make a mock up beam to cycle up to the frame to mark for bends and such, and be mindful of tie rod path/obstructions as well as how high you bump the front because it is really easy to have a ton of up travel with beams but in order to have a good working truck you need more up travel in the rear than the front (at ride height)
 
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