Skid plate hardware recommendations

Dezert4Runner

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Apr 18, 2022
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I’m looking for some feedback on hardware types and preferences for fabricated skid plates. I have a tube bumper that’s welded on up front on my 2000 Toyota 4Runner 4wd and will eventually get around to making a skid subframe and using an aluminum plate in front of the radiator and steel plate underneath the oil pan and steering rack areas. The hardware in question will be used with a (1/8”?) aluminum skid in the upper portion in front of the radiator for sure, and possibly the underside with thicker steel (3/16” most likely) that will see some action when I hit rock crawling trails.

I’ve seen All German Motorsports skid washers or countersunk tapered washers used on some of the cleaner bumper/ skid builds, but I’m not sure what style or size washers and bolts I should be looking at. Not super interested in Allen head because they like to strip easily, but if that’s the norm I’d consider using the tapered washers and get a Allen or Torx head tapered bolt. I much prefer the idea of using the AGM skid washers and a 6 or 12pt bolt, but those washers get pricy pretty quick @ $5-$15 a piece!

Open to suggestions and sources for preferred hardware.

AGM dome style
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Tapered
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I use countersunk 3/8" bolts on anything that's majority street driven. They're called stringer washers and I buy them and all my bolts from Allens Fasteners.

 
Currently runing button head torx.
I marred one up last time I was out. Thankfully there were still enough splines that I was able to just put a smaller torx driver in and the bolt backed right out.
 
I use countersunk 3/8" bolts on anything that's majority street driven. They're called stringer washers and I buy them and all my bolts from Allens Fasteners.

Ahh, stringer washers. Those will do fine for the aluminum portion. Thanks for the link.

Currently runing button head torx.
I marred one up last time I was out. Thankfully there were still enough splines that I was able to just put a smaller torx driver in and the bolt backed right out.
Allen vs torx is a bit if a toss up it seems. I can see the downsides to both. I wonder if the flush non-button head is a better option for that reason. Since the button head are more likely to get deformed from a hit because they stick out more.

I do 1/4" on skid plates. 1/8" will fold on a hit.
Makes sense.
 
Ahh, stringer washers. Those will do fine for the aluminum portion. Thanks for the link.


Allen vs torx is a bit if a toss up it seems. I can see the downsides to both. I wonder if the flush non-button head is a better option for that reason. Since the button head are more likely to get deformed from a hit because they stick out more.


Makes sense.
I thought about just swapping them for big hex heads but i know itll look like shit. I figured with a button head, if it gets marred too bad I can always grind a slot into it
 
I thought about just swapping them for big hex heads but i know itll look like shit. I figured with a button head, if it gets marred too bad I can always grind a slot into it
Yep, trying to get some form with the function. At least with the upper aluminum skid. The steel lowers are another story.

As @Giant Geoff said... thicker skid plate for sure. And if you are using the thicker skid plate why not just counter sink the allen bolts right into the skid plate?

View attachment 8966
I like this even better than having the washers. Much more seamless.

What are the best options for the mounting tabs and incorporating a fixed nut and not needing a lock washer? Weld a stover nut to the backside of the tab or is there a better solution? Use a thick enough tab to tap threads and use blue Loc-Tite? I’d prefer not to have separate hardware to accidentally drop if I need to unbolt it.
 
Having a welded on anything is just going to be a lot more work IMOP. The skid plate probably wont be removed more then once a year so I wouldn't over think it.

To second that... if you weld on something like a stover then you better get some high quality allen bolts and a nice allen tool because it could easily strip when putting them on or off.
 
True, an allen head and stover likely won’t play well with each other. Keep it simple, stupid!
 
Use these! I have them all over my truck. They're called u-clips, or tenneman clips (I think).

 
Similar option would be the rivnut tool which I use all the time (because I have no friends to hold a wrench).

 
Nut rivet tool is great for smaller items 1/4" or less that don't take much torque. For skid plates go with the U clips like mentioned, you can torque them on and off with a impact with no issues.
 
floating nut plate tabs for high abrasion areas, you can still drill them out and rivet a new one in. rivet nuts for anything else. Flat head screws countersunk in to the skid plates. You want .1875" minimum, .25" aluminum for a oil pan skid is good, just needs to be replaced somewhat often

edit: Douse the screws with anti seize, it will help getting screws out, especially if you have to break down and get out the easy out kit
 
Those clips remind me of car audio speaker installs lol. I suppose they’d work just fine. I like the pre-tapped tabs with a countersunk bolt. Either one appears to be a decent option. The anti-seize is good tip, noted!
 
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